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How To Achieve Good Design

How To Achieve Good Design

How To Achieve Good Design
  Published to Architectural & Interior Design on Sep 18, 2017

​There are clear processes involved when working towards achieving great design and meeting the ambitions of the client and in order to get the best from your design ideas and aspirations, it is often better to adopt a series of processes.

They need:

​A Clear Vision. In a School, for example, how Education and Learning are to be delivered in the future

A ​Client Advisor. This person is often someone who can translate that vision into a working brief, somebody who might challenge the ideas and design proposals that perhaps fall short of aspirations. They can also evaluate the designs as an expert client.

​well-thought approach to sustainability, both in terms of the construction and the use of the building when it is complete.

A ​clear idea, of functional requirements

A ​thorough brief, an essential part of the tool kit, it is often developed over a period of time with the end-users. It contains specific requirements and takes account of the changing needs and the adaptability of future patterns. 

​Skilled Designers, who can engage in a constructive dialogue with the end-users.

​Good providers, whether they are managers or builders, they need to be able to rise to the challenge of the design and work well with clients, engaging them in the process.

​A programme that provides sufficient time, for the designers to achieve the best possible solution.

​A realistic and robust budget, that is sufficient to achieve a building of quality.

Every architect’s design process is extremely personal and nuanced. For example, nearly every design process starts with a simple sketch in a lined pad using a simple marker. It`s best if the information needed for the design work can be taken directly from the site, although even that isn`t always necessary.  It`s surprising though, how many ideas and how much imagination can be derived from simply walking the site and looking at the design proposals from different angles.

Here`s 8 good design habits.

The design work has tell a good story.  It doesn`t really matter what it is that`s being designed, a House, a School or a Retail Store, the design has to tell a story and for most Clients, the journey from the initial concept right the way through to completion is part of that story. Imagination and Conceptualisation are very important parts of the design. Specific instructions from a Client to include only `White Walls and Ceilings` ​As much natural light as possible` 

They take risks. Re-think, Re-Imagine, Re-tool and Re-invent. There`s pretty much always new ways of doing old things. This isn’t to say that everything requires innovation or bold action, but looking at a problem through a different lens often reveals interesting solutions that don’t rely on standard practice.

They sweat the details. At its heart architecture seeks to solve problems, but it’s the way we’re able to solve those problems that separates the good from the bad. Details matter because they’re often the things we’re most engaged with on a daily basis. Bad detailing can ruin a good design and so its important that the design details are carefully thought through.

They simplify. 

They establish order. Designers prefer applying ordering principles to everything, at every level. 

Repeat, Repeat, Repeat. Repetition is often a good thing in architecture. Common thematic elements repeated again and again help to reinforce our previous habit of establishing order. Windows, doors, columns, beams, materials … these are all part of the natural order of buildings. Repetition doesn’t equate to boring; but rather it unifies a design. 

They break the rules. The prerequisite to this is the previous habit. Once we have an established repeating pattern, we can decide where to break the rules. Imagine a series of windows aligned on an orderly grid. The one window that breaks this set of rules must do so for a very important and specific reason.

They engage the senses. While the stunning visuals of the architecture we consume online appeal to our sense of sight, our experience of architecture is actually quite different. We’re taught as architects to think about all of our senses when designing. 


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